Stay in Line
50 pages
Age Range: 6 to 11
2012
ISBN: 9780992311803

Stay in Line

$24.95, Softcover
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Dederea Sherlock, Aisling Mulvihill Australian author

Hi Im Alfie! Im a little ant whose antennae are wired! Im a fun guy with boundless energy. I have the motor of a racing car and the brakes of a pushbike! Im always on the go. I often fidget and have difficulty staying seated. I find it difficult to wait my turn. When this happens, I might interrupt others conversations and games. I dont always think about the consequences of my actions, I just act! This gets me into a spot of trouble. My actions can annoy or frustrate others.

Controlling energy for learning and play can be difficult for some children. The story, Stay in Line, can help children learn about energy control, focused listening, and the importance of self-talk to guide actions.

By reading this story to a child you are facilitating a conscious knowledge of the skills of impulse control. Impulse control requires a child to stop and think before acting. This is a complex process that requires the use of inner speech to guide and direct actions. Impulse control is important to allow children to succeed in learning and social contexts. Through Alfie we meet a little ant character who experiences difficulty in this area. The impact of this difficulty becomes clear through a captivating description of a foraging mission gone wrong! Alfies hyperactivity and impulsivity frustrates others as it prevents him from engaging effectively in everyday tasks. Luckily the ever-helpful Hoppy Ant steps in to guide the learning of skills necessary to overcome these difficulties. Children will enjoy this humorous and entertaining story as they are introduced to the skills of impulse control.

Each book has explanatory notes for both parents and professionals, these clearly outline the rational for each new skill and the 'how to' in teaching the skill. At keypoints throughout each story, there are helpful hints to prompt discussion that guide the adult-child conversation.

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